Month: May 2017

What is Subjective Culture ?

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The concept of subjective culture comes from Dr. Harry Triandis, a cross cultural psychologist, viewed culture as objective (described as material also) and subjective.

Subjective culture comprises ideas, attitudes and beliefs. An inter-culturist would focus primarily on subjective culture.

Material culture are man-made such as clothes and tools. On the other hand, subjective culture is the intangible part of culture such as ideas, attitudes, assumptions and beliefs. In other words, it is a society’s characteristic way of perceiving its social environment”.

We can subdivide these further by taking either an ‘etic’ or ’emic’ approach to studying the subjective elements.

“Etic” refers to the general categories. These elements can be found in all cultures and which we use to make comparisons.

“Emic” refers to elements which are specific to a given culture. This makes cultures unique.

Cultures have their own unique mix of beliefs, attitudes, norms and values.

These elements can also impact how we deal with conflict, communicate and negotiate. We will be discussing these elements Conflict Resolution, Negotiation and Presentation Weekend Schools -8, 9 and 10 December 2017 for further details email Interlawconferences@gmail.com or the contact form below.

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What is in your ‘Cultural’ Suitcase ?

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Cultural baggage is a metaphor used to describe attitudes, patterns, judgments or expectations we have “packed” in our home cultures and which influence us on a subconscious level. We need to be aware of them when face to face in cross-cultural situations. As Edward T. Hall said ‘the ultimate purpose of the study of culture is not so much the understanding of foreign cultures as much as the light that study sheds on our own.’

As we evaluate your own assumptions, orientations, or preferences, we need to be willing to consider other values, identities, or ways of doing things that might be “not wrong, just different.”

So what is in your suitcase ? Unpacking your suitcase will be part of our training sessions Conflict Resolution, Negotiation and Presentation Weekend Schools -8, 9 and 10 December 2017. Email interlawconferences@gmail.com for further details or complete the form below

What are Interpersonal Skills ?

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Interpersonal skills can be described as life skills. We use them every day when we are communicating and interacting with others.

Some people seem naturally gifted at communication and interaction. They seem super  confident. But they were not born that way ! Like all skills, also interpersonal skills need to be developed and refined through learning and practice.

It may be true that some communicators do have a natural talent or predisposition upon which they can build. But we know that many talented atheletes need to train and practice long hours so it should not surprise us to discover that some presenters for TED Talks may practice their presentations up to 9 months.

So whether you are negotiating, presenting or networking you need to practice, practice, practice!

Developing your interpersonal skills can have a positive impact on both your professional and personal life.

Employers know that people with such skills will be able to work well within a team and communicate effectively with colleagues as well as customers and clients.

I have prepared special workshop sessions in our December training course to ensure that you have a solid basis to start building on your own natural talents (Conflict Resolution, Negotiation and Presentation Weekend Schools -8, 9 and 10 December 2017)

Send an email to interlawconferences@gmail.com for further details or fill in the contact form below.

 

Cross Cultural Communication

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Understanding attitudes and processes in other cultures may affect your experience of commercial and social encounters.

We live in a globalized and international world which is interlinked. This brings with it complexities not only in an intra-cultural sense but also in an inter-cultural sense.

Interactions can be challenging, confusing, and even contentious.

Different cultural backgrounds or contexts can lead to misunderstandings and lost opportunities, if we do not understand, where the other party is ‘coming from’.

In today’s world, apart from being well-versed in our own professional material (hard skills such as law, accounting, management, marketing etc…), we invariably also need to have intercultural sensitivity and competencies (soft skills). 

Understanding cultural context will be discussed during Conflict Resolution, Negotiation and Presentation Weekend Schools -8, 9 and 10 December 2017.

 We will learn how to be sensitive to cultural aspects when doing presentations, participating in conflict resolution meetings and in negotiations.

Send an email to interlawconferences@gmail.com for further details or visit our website: http://internationaleventsandlawconferences.yolasite.com/conflict-resolution-negotiation-presentation.php to enrol or complete the contact form below.

Hard Skills v Soft Skills

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Hard Skills can be defined as bachelor degrees, masters and any other post-graduate studies. But we all know that hard skills are only part of our professional success.

Soft skills such as the skills for effective communication, conflict resolution and negotiation skills are more and more being used as a yardstick to differentiate an average professional  from a professional who moves up the ladder of success exponentially.

In an ever-changing global economy and much cross-border contact and transactions, we also need to take into account intercultural differences (Italian v Chinese; Italian v Indian). The challenges differ and may be distinguishable from intra-cultural aspects (Italian v Italian).

Every businesses success depends on our ability to adapt and effectively exercise our cross-cultural communication skills and adapt to difficult situations. This is all to be carefully balanced with the need to maintain commercial relationships.

With this in mind, I have prepared 3 different modules for ourConflict Resolution, Negotiation and Presentation Weekend Schools -8, 9 and 10 December 2017.

The background theory will be examined so that participants can adapt to different cultural scenarios with ease. The theory will be further consolidated through practical exercises through workshops and with feedback.

For further details please send an email to interlawconferences@gmail.com or fill in the contact form below.

I look forward to welcoming you all in December.

Sofia Parastatidou

 

 

Do you feel like a fish out of water ?

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10014766_982333111813581_8405223611769093801_oThis metaphor is probably how we feel when we find ourselves in a strange and unfamiliar cultural atmosphere. Verbal communication and non-verbal communication may be confusing to us. We may misunderstand the meanings or experiencing discomfort.

Feeling like a fish out of water was first used in 1952 by Kalvero Oberg in his article on what is cultural shock. He coined the word dis-ease to describe a discomfort when we are confronted with a new cultural context we do not recognize.

Learning how to overcome this initial dis-ease will be addressed during our training sessions Conflict Resolution, Negotiation and Presentation Weekend Schools -8, 9 and 10 December 2017

Send an email to interlawconferences@gmail.com for further details or visit our website: http://internationaleventsandlawconferences.yolasite.com/conflict-resolution-negotiation-presentation.php to enrol or fill in the contact form below

 

What is intercultural communication ?

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Intercultural communication may be broadly defined as ‘communication between people from two different cultures’ (Chen & Starosta, 1998:28).

Other definitions include ‘a symbolic, interpretive, transactional, contextual process, in which people from different cultures create shared meanings’ (Lustig & Koester, 2007:46) or ‘the effects on communication behavior, when different cultures interact together. Hence, one way of viewing intercultural communication is as communication that unfolds in symbolic intercultural spaces’. (Arasaratnam, 2013:48)

We will be talking about cultural context during our training sessions in Conflict Resolution, Negotiation and Presentation Weekend Schools -8, 9 and 10 December 2017

Send an email to interlawconferences@gmail.com for further details or visit our website: http://internationaleventsandlawconferences.yolasite.com/conflict-resolution-negotiation-presentation.php to enrol or fill in the contact form below:-